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John Dury, dedication to 'Irelands Natural History'

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Created on: Feb 23, 2011 2:36 PM by hi4tl - Last Modified:  Feb 23, 2011 2:36 PM by hi4tl

Title:JOHN DURY'S DEDICATION TO PRINTED TRACT, 'IRELANDS NATURAL HISTORY', GERARD BOATE
Date:1652
Ref: Selection ot text (sig. A1-5)
Notes: Full text comprises: Dedication by John Dury [incorrectly signed by Hartlib] (sig. A2r-A5r); Letter to Hartlib by Arnold Boate (sig. A6r-A8r: not included here); Main text by Gerard Boate (pp. 1-186: not included here); Contents (pp. 187-191: not included here). Second edition (1657) is of similar content. [HDC list of The Publications of Samuel Hartlib, Turnbull: No. 41]


[Long-Title and Bibliographical description to first edition:]

Boate, Gerard

ST: Irelands naturall history.

Wing Number: B3372   Wing Microfilm: 123.10

[within single rules]

IRELANDS | NATVRALL | HISTORY. | Being a true and ample Description of its Situation, Greatness, Shape, and Nature; | Of its Hills, Woods, Heaths, Bogs; Of its Fruit- | full Parts and profitable Grounds, with the severall | way of Manuring and Improving the same: | With its Heads or Promontories, Harbours, | Roades and Bayes; Of its Springs and Fountaines, | Brookes, Rivers, Loghs; Of its Metalls, Mineralls, Free | stone, Marble, Sea-coal, Turf, and other things | that are taken out of the ground. | And lastly, of the Nature and temperature | of its Air and Season, and what diseases it is free | from, or subject unto. Conducing to the Advance- | ment of Navigation, Husbandry, and other | profitable Arts and Professions. | [rule] | Written by Gerard Boate, late Doctor of | Physick to the State in Ireland. | And now Published | BY | SAMUEL HARTLIB, Esq; | For the Common Good of Ireland and more especially, for the benefit of the Adventurers | and Planters therein. | [rule] | Imprinted at London, for John Wright at the | Kings Head in the Old Buyley. 1652.

8o: A-N8; [$4 (-A1 B,N 4; with G3 missigned G4) signed]; 104 leaves

pp. [16] 1-186 [187-191]

[Long-Title and Bibliographical description to second edition:]

Boate, Gerard

ST: Irelands naturall history - Anr. ed.

Wing Number: B3373   Wing Microfilm: 1350.5

[within single rules, 146x82mm.]

IRELANDS | NATURALL | HISTORY. | Being a true and ample Description of | its Situation, Greatness, Shape, and Nature; | Of its Hills, Woods, Heaths, Bogs; Of its Fruit- | full Parts and profitable Grounds, with the severall ways | of Manuring and Improving the same: | With its Heads or Promontories Harbours, Roads and Bays; Of its Springs and Fountains, | Brooks, Rivers, Loghs; Of its Metalls, Mineralls, Free- | stone, Marble, Sea-coal. Turf, and other things | that are taken out of the ground. | And lastly, of the Nature and | temperature | of its Air and Season, and what diseases it is free | from, or subject unto. Conducing to the Advance- | ment of Navigation, Husbandry, and other | profitable Arts and Profes sions. | [rule] | Written by Gerard Boate, late Doctor of | Physick to the State in Ireland. | And now Published by | SAMUEL HARTLIB, Esq, | For the Common Good of Ireland, and more | especially, for the benefit of the Adventurers | and Planters therein. | [rule] | Imprinted at London, for John Wright at the | Kings Head in the Old Baily. 1657.

8o: A-N8; [$4 (-A1 B,N 4; with G3 missigned G4) signed]; 104 leaves

pp. [16] 1-186 [187-191]


[Selection ot text begins:]

[sig. A1r]

                    IRELANDS

                    NATURAL

                    HISTORY

Being a true and ample Description of its Situation, Greatness, Shape, and Nature; Of its Hills, Woods, Heaths, Bogs; Of its Fruitfull Parts and profitable Grounds, with the severall way of Manuring and Improving the same:

With its Heads or Promontories, Harbours, Roades and Bayes,; Of its Springs and Fountaines, Brookes, Rivers, Loghs; Of its Metalls, Mineralls, Free stone, Marble, Sea-coal, Turf, and other things that are taken out of the ground.

And lastly, of the Nature and temperature of its Air and Season, and what diseases it is free from, or subject unto. Conducing to the Advancement of Navigation, Husbandry, and other profitable Arts and Professions.

------------------------------------------------------

Written by Gerard Boate, late Doctor of Physick to the State in Ireland.

               And now Published

                    BY

               SAMUELL HARTLIB, Esq;

For the Common Good of Ireland, and more especially, for the benefit of the Adventurers and Planters therein.

------------------------------------------------------

     Imprinted at London, for John Wright at the

          Kings Head in the Old Bayley. 1652.

[sig. A2r]

               [decorative block]

               To His Excellency

                OLIVER CROMWEL,

           Captain Generall of the

           Common-wealths Army in England,

               Scotland and Ireland, and Chan-

                cellor of the University of

                    OXFORD.

                     AND

           To the Right Honorable

                CHARLES FLEETWOOD,

           Commander in Chief (under the

               Lord Generall Cromwell) of all the

                Forces in IRELAND.

Right Honourable

   IT is a very great and signal Truth, that all the works of God are both wonderfull and precious, much sought out by all those that love him: and it is the guilt of the wicked, that as they regard not the Lord, so they consider not the Operation of his hands; for the Lord hath re- [catchword: vealed]

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     [Page Title:The Epistle Dedicatory. Title on each of the following pages.]

[In margin: Rom. 1.20]

vealed his Truth, even his Godhead and his Eternall Power by his Workes, that such as respect him not, in the Creation of the World, and in the wayes of his Providence, may be without excuse: Now it seems to mee, that the end for which God hath not left himself without a Testimony in Nature, is not onely, that we should in our spirit glorifie him as God and be thankfull, [In margin: Act. 14.17] but that also our Outward Man should bee made sensible of his goodness, and partake of that supply of life, which by his appointment the Creature can yeeld unto us, if happily wee may feel after him and find him not therein. [In margin: Act. 17.27] So that such as respect him not in his wayes of Nature, being careless to seek them out, do make themselves also incapable of the blessings of Nature through their ignorance and neglect of the good things which God hath provided for them thereby: for all things are Ours, things present and things to come; and Godliness hath the promise of the life that now is aswell as of that which is to come: for as by the act of Faith we are made capable of the good things of the life to come, because by the truth of God, as it is the Object of our Faith, they have a spirituall being and Subsistence in us [catchword: so]

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so by the act of Reason rightly ordered we are made partakers of the benefit of this life, because by the effect of Gods Wisedom and Power in Nature, as they are the Objects of our Reasonable facultie, they have a bodily being and subsistence in us: and as the Wisdom of God doth many wayes manifest it self, not only in Spirituall but also in Outward and Bodily things, so there are many parts of Humane Learning, some wherof are subservient to the Private life of a single man, some to the comforts and Publick Use of a Societie, and amongst all these parts of Learning, which relate to a Society, I can conceive none more profitable in Nature, than that of Husbandry. For whether we reflect upon the first settlement of a Plantation, to prosper it, or upon the wealth of a Nation that is planted, to increase it, this is the Head spring of all native Commerce & Trading which may bee set afoot therein by any way whatsoever. Now to advance Husbandry either in the production and perfection of earthly benefits, or in the management thereof by way of Trading, I know nothing more usefull, than to have the knowledg of the Naturall History of each Nation advanced & perfected: For as it is [catchword: evi-]

[sig. A3v]

dent, that except the benefits which God by Nature hath bestowed upon each Country bee known, there can be no Industrie used towards the improvement and Husbandry thereof; so except Husbandry be improved, the industrie of Trading, whereof a Nation is capable, can neither be advanced or profitably upheld.

   There is a twofold body, and a twofold life in man, which God hath created, the one is Naturall, the other Spiritual, & the Apostle tells us, that the Spirituall is not first, but the Naturall, and afterward that which is Spirituall; [In margin: 1 Cor.15.46.] as the Bodies and lives of men are ordered by God, so we must conceive of the frames of their Societies, that the Naturall is before that which is Spirituall, & that in Gods aime it is a preparatory thereunto; although in the use which men make thereof, this aime is not obtained: for seeing in the wisdom of God, the world by wisdome hath not known God; therefore God is pleased by another way which to the World doth seem foolishness, to manifest his Power and his Wisdome unto salvation, namely by the Preaching of the Gospel in the name of Iesus Christ, and him crucified; [In margin: 1 Cor. 1 &c.] and although hitherto, since the death of Christ, the dispensati- [catchword: on]

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on of wisdome hath not yet opened the conduit pipes of Naturall Knowledge to cause the souls of men flow forth & partake in the life of God therein, by reason of the prevalencie of Sensuall inclinations, & of the want of due reflection upon Christ, in whom alone the perfect use of Nature is brought home to the glory of the Father, by the Spirit, yet when the time of the Restauration of all things, shall come from the presence of him, who will come shortly and will not tarry, then the works of the Devill, whereby he hath brought us, & the whole Creation, under the bondage of Corruption, shall be destroied, & the whole Creation, under the bondage of Corruption, shall be destroied, & when the Nature & right use of the Creature by his meanes obscured, shall be revealed, then also the properties and application of the Creature in the glorious liberty of the sonnes of God, shall be subjected unto Grace.

   There great and mighty Changes, which God is making in the Earth, do tend to break the yokes of Vanity, and to weaken the Power, which hath wreathed the same upon the necks of the Nations, these Changes seem to me to presage the neer approaches of this Liberty, and the advancement of the ways of Learning, whereby the Intellectuall [catchword: Ca-]

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Cabinets of Nature are opened, and the effects therof discovered, more fully to us, that to former Ages, seem in like mannter to prepare a plainer Address unto the right use thereof for us than our forefathers have had: which will be effectuall to the manifestation of Gods Wisdome, Power, and Goodness, when the great promises shall be accomplished, that the Earth shall be filled with the knowledge of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea, & that we shall be taught of God, from the least to the greatest: [In margin: Isa. 1?9. Heb. 8.11?] and although the Father hath reserved in his own hand the times and seasons, wherein these promises are to be fulfilled, yet as by the dawning of the day we can know that the Sun is neer rising, so by the breaking of yoakes & the breaking forth of the meanes of more perfect knowledge, both in Natural and Spiritual things, wee may see the drawing neer of the promises, which will in their own times Constitute the day of Salvation unto all the Earth, wherein all flesh shall see the glory of the Lord together. [In margin: Isa. 40.5.]

   The expectations of this day is the hope of Israel; and those that wait for the Lord, and his appearance therein, shall find a plentious redemption; namely such as having this hope purifie them- [catchword: selves]

[sig. A5r]

selves that they may be found in peace at his appearing, and such as being solicitous to bestow their Talents in their way and generation, to the advancement of his approaching Kingdom, shall approve themselves as faithfull servants to him in that day. Of this Number I am perswaded your Honours are in these Nations as Leading Men; therefore I have made bold thus to address my self unto you, and to inscribe this Work unto your Names, that it may see the light under your joint patronage. God hath made You very eminent Instruments to set forward one part of the preparatives of his great Work, the Breaking of our yokes, the other part, which is the Advancement of Spirituall and Natural sanctified Knowledge, your Zeal, I am sure will carry you to countenance by the wayes which Providence shall open unto You. Therefore I hope it wil not be without acceptance, what in this kind (though but a mean beginning) I have here offered. Your influence upon it, to set forward Learned Endeavours of this Nature for a Publick Good may be a blessing unto Posteritie, and your Relations of Eminent note, unto Ireland, to watch for the good therof, [catchword: and]

[sig. A5v]

and to the Universities of Oxford and Dublin, to countenance all the Meanes of profitable Learning, have encouraged me to make this Dedication; besides the expressions of your Honours willingness, to favour me in my undertakings, which I knew no way so well to resent, as by offering to your Generous Inclinations, the Objects, which are worthy of being considered and set forward in order to a common good. I look't also somewhat upon the hopefull appearance of Replanting Ireland shortly, not only by the Adventurers, but happily by the calling in of exiled Bohemians and other Protestants also, and happily by the invitation of some well affected out of the Low Countries, which to advance are thoughts suitable to your noble genius, and to further the settlement thereof, the Naturall History of that Countrie will not bee unfit, but very subservient. Thus beseeching the Lord to prosper all your undertakings of the glory of the Kingdom of Christ, I take my leave, and rest unfeignedly

 

                              Your Honours most

                                   humble servant

 

                              SAMUEL HARTLIB.


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